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CHLOROPRENE RUBBER

DESCRIPTION
Chloroprene (commonly known as "Neoprene") is one of the oldest synthetic elastomers. Introduced in 1931, it is used in a variety of applications due to its ability to resist both oils and oxidation. The oil resistance, however, depends significantly on the type of oil. Chloroprene has good resistance to napthenic and paffaffinc oils of high molecular weight, but swells excessively in aromatic oils of low molecular weight. Vulcanizates of chloroprene display little significant change after prolonged outdoor exposure. Because of its chlorine content, flame resistance is superior to that of most other rubbers. Some chloroprene vulcanizates, especially O-Rings, sometimes exhibit distortion due to crystallization of the rubber at room temperature. This effect can be completely reversed by warming the parts in low heat. Chloroprene is especially well suited to rubber-to-metal bonding.
COMPOSITION
Produced from the chloroprene monomer, a combination of cholorine and butadiene.  Medium Density.

PHYSICAL PROPERTIES* Excellent Good Fair Poor
Abrasion resistance      
Compression Set      
Elongation      
Flame resistance      
Gas permeability      
Low temperature flexibility      
Tear resistance      
Tensile strength      


CHEMICAL RESISTANCE* Excellent Good Fair Poor
Automotive refrigerants      
Dilute acids      
Dilute alkalis      
Ozone      
Steam      
Water      
Weather      

OPERATING TEMPERATURE
-40 to 225 °F

*Excellent, good, fair and poor are intended to serve as general guidelines only. Actual testing in the application environment is always recommended.